Category Archives: Heat Pumps

Feasibility of Sea Water Heat Pump Plant in Helsinki

Feasibility of Sea Water Heat Pump Plant in Helsinki

2015

Feasibility of Sea Water Heat Pump Plant in Helsinki
The key elements considered in the feasibility study are the following:
Technical design and dimensioning of the heat pump plant with 100 MW of heating capacity
Flow diagrams and layout drawings for multiple plant configurations (alternatives includes direct/indirect sea water connection, and with/without combined cooling production)
Preliminary electrification and automation design and dimensioning
Investment and O&M cost estimates for the plant configurations alternatives
Selection of the optimum plant configuration

  • Cooling production simulations (including electricity and water consumptions)
  • Investment and O&M cost estimates for plant life-cycle
  • Cash flow and financial analysis for several system alternatives

Client: Helen Ltd

Helen Ltd is one of the largest energy companies in Finland supplying electric energy to about 400,000 customers and covering more than 90 percent of the heat demand of the capital city with district heat. Helen Ltd also produces and sells district cooling, which is considerably expanding in Helsinki.

Among the services provided by Helen Ltd are the design, projecting and maintenance of energy production and distribution systems.

Marja-Vantaa Area District Cooling System

Marja-Vantaa Area District Cooling System

Feasibility Study; 2009 – 2010
Marja-Vantaa District Cooling

The project was carried out by Greenfield Consulting in cooperation with Vantaa Energy Ltd, which is one of Finland’s largest municipal energy companies. The company is owned by the City of Vantaa (60%) and the City of Helsinki (40%). Vantaa Energy produces and sells electricity and district heating. In addition, it offers natural gas for the needs of industry. The company is responsible for the construction, operation and maintenance of district heating networks in Vantaa. A significant part of the electricity is generated efficiently at the Martinlaakso combined heat and power plant, which uses natural gas and coal as main fuels.

Heat and electricity demands as well as potential energy supply schemes for the new residential and workplace area of Marja-Vantaa were evaluated by Vantaa Energy Ltd.

District cooling has not been assessed before in the area of Vantaa. Currently only two large scale district cooling networks exist in Finland, located in Helsinki and Turku. The target of the project was to evaluate the cooling potential of Marja-Vantaa area, and to find out the most cost-effective district cooling system taking into account the environmental aspects. The study also included comparing centralized district cooling with decentralized cooling production.

To start with, the study reviewed the general global development trends in air conditioning. After establishing the cooling demand at Marja-Vantaa, a concept design was carried out for different cooling alternatives including network design and extent, routing and specific sites. Different cooling production technologies based on absorption process and electrical compressors were assessed as well as all the other components associated with district cooling systems from the cooling production down to customer side were evaluated.

Three district cooling system configurations were formed by comprising absorption chillers, compressor chillers, heat pumps and other components related to a district cooling system. The work included assessing the operational efficiencies, investment and O&M costs for each alternative. Financial analysis included net present value and internal rate of return taking into account all investment and operating costs for each system configurations during the operation of 25 years. Carbon dioxide emissions were calculated and climate effects of refrigerants of the chillers were evaluated.

As a conclusion, the compressor cooling system proved to be more cost-effective compared to either absorption cooling or heat pump system, although margins were not significant. From CO2 emission point of view, the heat pump system would be the most advantageous, saving a total of 1,700 tonnes of CO2 annually. Compressor cooling system would cause annual emissions of 210 tCO2 and absorption cooling system 160 tCO2 respectively.


Client: Vantaa Energy Ltd

Vantaa Energy Ltd is one of Finland’s largest urban energy companies. Vantaa Energy produces and sells electricity and district heating. In addition, it offers natural gas for the requirements of industry.

Heat Recovery from Sewage (Finland)

Heat Recovery from Sewage (Finland)

Heat Recovery from Sewage

2012

The study was a part of the overall RESCA-project (Renewable Energy Solutions in City Areas) in which HSY and several Finnish cities cooperate aiming to increase the utilization of renewable energy by creating common operating models and disseminating best practices.

Sewage water has high heat energy potential which can be harnessed by using the heat pump technology. The project included reviewing waste water heat recovery technologies (large-scale heat pump units, sewage heat exchangers etc.), outlining the business model for utilizing sewage waste heat, as well as the financial analysis for different heat recovery system alternatives.

The project was related to the “light district heating” project (reduced supply temperature) analyzed for the connection of the Marja-Vantaa area. Lower DH temperature levels would improve the aptitude of sewage heat pumps for heat production.

The project results were used in the decision making regarding the sewage heat recovery pilot project considered at Marja-Vantaa area.


Client: Helsinki Region Environmental Services Authority (HSY)

Helsinki Region Environmental Services Authority (HSY) is a regional authority providing environmental services for residents and companies in the Helsinki area. Their principal duties comprise water and waste management as well as regional information services.

Feasibility Study and Pre-engineering of Cooling and Heat Recovery System (Heat pump station)

Feasibility Study and Pre-engineering of Cooling and Heat Recovery System (Heat pump station)

Heat Pump Unit 2Feasibility study and pre-engineering; 2013

The project work included the Feasibility Study and Pre-engineering for a cooling and heat recovery system with 3,3 MWCooling of cooling capacity and 4,7 MWHeating) of heat recovery. The work included the following::

  • Heat pump capacity optimization
  • Connection to the district heating network and to the cooling customer
  • Modeling of the heating and cooling production
  • Preliminary flow diagrams and layout drawings
  • Electrification, automation and HVAC
  • Investment and O&M cost estimates
  • Least cost analysis
  • Preliminary cooling tariffs

The project was managed by Helsinki Energy and will be carried out by Greenfield Consulting in close cooperation with Helsinki Energy specialists on each engineering area.


Client: Elenia Heat Ltd

Elenia heating company produces district heating and electricity and sells and distributes district heating and natural gas in Häme, Central Finland, Northern Ostrobothnia and Heinola. The company operates in approximately 10 municipalities in total. Natural gas is used as a fuel in the company’s operations and distributed to customers in six population centers. Electricity is produced for the national transmission grid at the Vanaja power plant in Hämeenlinna.

Elenia heating business has currently nearly 5 000 customer contracts and some 85 000 end users. There are approximately 200 district heating companies in Finland, the majority being owned by municipalities. Elenia heating company is Finland’s second-largest private supplier of district heating.

Heat Recovery and Cooling System for Data Center

Heat Recovery and Cooling System for Data Center

data_center_cooling

2012

Greenfield Consulting carried out a techno-economic analysis and preliminary technical design for the cooling system for a Data Center.


Client: Helen Ltd.

As one of the largest energy companies in Finland, Helen Ltd. supplies electric energy to about 400,000 customers in Finland and covers more than 90 percent of the heat demand of the capital city with district heat. Helen Ltd. produces and sells district cooling, which is considerably expanding in Helsinki (Customers’ connection power was 120 MW in 2011). The District cooling network of Helen Ltd. is the third largest and fastest growing in Europe.

Helsinki City Centre Underground District Cooling Station

Helsinki City Centre Underground District Cooling Station

Implementation phase; 2012– (in progress)

Helsinki Underground District Cooling Station Construction

Helen Ltd. is currently constructing a district cooling station under the city centre of Helsinki.

The implementation phase of the project includes the following sub-projects:

  • Excavation
  • Construction works
  • Process and machinery
  • HVAC
  • Electrification
  • Automation

Performance data of the station (after first construction phase):

  • Cooling capacity (accumulator only): 40 MW
  • Water volume: 35 000 m³
  • Energy capacity: 230 MWh

The installation of heat pump units (2 × 15 MW) depends on the DC customers’ connected capacity forecast; new installations are required when the connected DC load exceeds the production capacity.

Greenfield Consulting contribution to the project

Jussi-Pekka Kuivala M.Sc. (tech.) is assigned to support the project head engineer of Helen Ltd. The tasks include extensive studies and planning works as well as participating in the procurements and procurement control having reference to process and machinery sub-projects.

Pre-engineering of an Underground District Cooling Station, City Centre, Helsinki, Finland; 2011 – 2012

Helsinki Underground District Cooling Station Rendering

Helen Ltd. was planning to construct an underground district cooling station in the city centre of Helsinki. The cooling station would involve a rock cavern accumulator and a reservation for heat pump units for complementary cooling capacity.

Pre-engineering work included process and mechanical engineering, electrical, automation, HVAC and building engineering sub-projects.

Greenfield Consulting contribution to the project

Greenfield Consulting was assigned to support the project head engineer of Helen Ltd. The tasks involved the cooling station process engineering, including the selection of optimal production capacity as well as the designing of both technically and economically optimal process flow diagram. The layout design was carried out based on the process and machinery engineering.


Client: Helen Ltd.

Helen Ltd. is one of the largest energy companies in Finland supplying electric energy to about 400,000 customers and covering more than 90 percent of the heat demand of the capital city with district heat. Helen Ltd. also produces and sells district cooling, which is considerably expanding in Helsinki.

Among the services provided by Helen Ltd. are the design, projecting and maintenance of energy production and distribution systems.

District Cooling Stations in Helsinki – Pre-feasibility studies

District Cooling Stations in Helsinki – Pre-feasibility studies

2013 – 2014

CHC-station (Combined Heating and Cooling Station) alternatives

The considered alternatives included the CHC-station, which is planned to serve both the district cooling and the district heating networks of Helen Ltd., and the separate peak load station.

The key elements considered in the pre-feasibility studies were the following:

  • Heat pump concept and configuration including connections to district cooling and heating networks
  • Maximum capacity and optimum unit size taking into account the space available at the plant
  • Preliminary layout for heat pump units
  • Budgetary offers for heat pump units
  • Investment and O&M costs estimations for plant life cycle
  • Least cost analysis

The project design and calculations were carried out by Greenfield Consulting in close cooperation with Helen Ltd.


Client: Helen Ltd.

Helen Ltd. is one of the largest energy companies in Finland supplying electric energy to about 400,000 customers and covering more than 90 percent of the heat demand of the capital city with district heat. Helsinki Smart City combines both district heating and cooling networks in a way that enables utilization of waste energies in an innovative and effective way, while reducing environmental load.